2020 State of the Word Thoughts

December 17, 2020 00:42:00
2020 State of the Word Thoughts
WP Review
2020 State of the Word Thoughts
/

Hosted By

Joe Casabona

Show Notes

Matt Mullenweg gave his annual State of the Word, an update on all things WordPress, . He focused on a few key areas, like how WordPress grew in a pandemic year, an update on each major release of WordPress, and where Gutenberg is going. There was also a big focus in the Q&A on virtual events, multilingual WordPress, and performance.

Thanks to Nexcess and GoDaddy Pro for Sponsoring this series!

Show Notes

View Full Transcript

Episode Transcript

Hey, everybody. Welcome to another episode of the WordPress Year in Review podcast. Earlier today, it was the State Of The Word 2020 given by Matt Mullenweg. And so today I’m going to share with you the audio from my reaction live stream. So this is the direct audio from the live stream. I’ve only edited it a little bit, but it’s kind of very obvious from the live stream. So if you want, I will link in the show notes over at [wpreview.io] the actual YouTube link where you can see me adding comments to the screen and showing different screenshots from the State Of The Word. You’ll get the gist of it without seeing it if you’d rather listen to it in podcast form. But I’m just letting you know that perhaps, this particular episode will be better consumed over on the live stream. Now, I’ll say all of this in the live audio. But just to give a quick primer, the State Of The Word was only about 26 minutes this year. It’s about half of what it normally is probably because it was prerecorded. And then we had about an hour’s worth of questions. So I thought that that was really nice. They hit on a few big topics, the Block Editor, obviously, but virtual events and then being more accessible, multi-lingual came up a lot. And then a performance came up a lot. So well, what you’re about to hear are my thoughts right after the State Of The Word. I live-tweeted the whole thing too. I’ll link that over at [wpreview.io]. But, thanks so much for tuning into this. And let me know what you think afterward. You can comment on the YouTube video or anything else. Yeah. So here we go. Let’s bring in the audio from the live stream. Hey, everybody. I hope you enjoyed the State Of The Word 2020. It was about 26 minutes of Matt giving updates. And then about an hour’s worth of questions and answers, which I thought was pretty cool. I, you know, I thought that that was a nice way to highlight the community. So, I’m gonna dive right in. I’m gonna dive right into some of my thoughts and updates. I was live-tweeting, basically the entire thing, or doing the best I can at least to live-tweet the entire thing. So I’m going to tweet that I’m live. Even though, probably if any of you saw my tweet you’ll know I’m live. So I took notes and I live-tweeted. So I’m just gonna run through the tweets. I tried to take pretty judicious notes here. So I’m going to scroll back to the beginning of my tweets, and kind of see how things progressed. Matt started off by giving his standard updates, you know, said, and while he said, howdy everybody, that’s how he, I think that’s how he opens most of his, I think that’s how he opens most of his State Of The Word. I’ll have to go back and watch. “Howdy Patrick! Thanks for joining me here for my hot takes”. If anybody has any comments, feel free to drop them into the comments and reactions, comments, questions, things like that. I will be happy to highlight them. So Matt started with ‘howdy everybody’. And then he just went right into the three major releases. Something that I thought was interesting was that he introduced himself I think, a little more than he normally would have if it was an in-person WordCamp US. Because I think the assumption is that if you are paying money to attend WordCamp US, you probably know who Matt is, or you at least have a history or a general idea of who Matt is and what WordPress is. But the live stream where people could watch it for free at any time they want. There’s no context of an event around the State Of The Word this year. Matt introduced himself who he is, what he does, and he did the same thing with Gutenberg. So he talked about the three major releases, 5.4 first. But he mentioned Gutenberg and he gave a brief introduction or overview of what Gutenberg is. I thought interestingly there that he made the distinction between the Block Editor and Gutenberg. This was something that there’s been some chatter online about some confusion or potential confusion around What is the Block Editor versus what is Gutenberg? Are they the same? I don’t see Gutenberg in WordPress, and I’m confused by the plugin. So Matt took some time to define that and say kind of why they have the plugin, why they have the plugin, and why it continues to be developed under the name Gutenberg. He went over the four phases of Gutenberg which are editing inside the post page, which was phase one. Phase two, which we are currently in, editing outside the post and page. So things like the head or the foot, or the widget areas. Collaboration, which is on deck for next year, and then a multi-lingual aspect bringing native multi-lingual aspects to WordPress. He said that’s just in the migration stage at this point targeted for 2022. So a little bit of time before we get to that. And of course, I remember 5.0 coming out like it was just yesterday. So, I’m sure that time will fly by much to the chagrin of the development team, who has to think about these problems. So he went through an overview of 5.4, 5.5, and 5.6. Some notable things. 5.5 had over 800 contributors. It’s the most contributors ever for a major release of a WordPress project. That was pretty great. Really nice to see that here in 2020. He also mentioned that block patterns, which is one of his favorite new features., and he mentioned a full site editing the distraction or not photo editing, I’m sorry. The distraction-free editor. Now, a little context behind that is that was something that he decided to ship very quickly in 5.4. I think they were in Beta. They were in Beta close to the release candidate and he said, “I want the distraction-free editor on by default for WordPress”. So, there was a little bit of drama around that because it was a late-breaking change that happened that fundamentally changed the UI. He likes it. I personally do not like it because I’m always reaching for something in the admin, even if it’s usually just like the view post. And that’s hidden by distraction-free editing. So that’s something I thought was interesting that he pointed out. But block patterns, one of his favorite new features, are super cool. He had a great quote from Sarah Gooding on 5.5. The 5.5 update is a testament to the stability of WordPress during uncertain times, as well as its unstoppable distributed contributor base who continue to get things done despite the pandemic’s unique challenges. And I think we probably saw he highlighted a lot in the State Of The Word, the power of our community. The reason that we want to be so inclusive and accessible to everybody is because our community has shown strength throughout the pandemic through things like the events going online, our community being able to pivot. And of course, the thousands, I think of contributors this year, right? I mean, it’s probably hundreds, maybe a thousand. But we had over 800 at 5.5, we had over 600 at 5.6, which I think was, really fantastic. So, then he talked about 5.6. 5.6 ‘Simone’ introduced major core updates as well as Twenty Twenty One. It was also the first all-women and non-binary release team. So, kudos to the team there. Again, another highlight of the greatness of our community. And then he mentioned that we’ve cracked 39% web usage, right? So some of the first of 2020 that Matt highlighted a virtual State Of The Word that was a first cracking 39%. And, along with that, he said that it was the fastest growth year over year, right. We have not seen WordPress grow as fast in a single year than we have this year. And then lots of online events that happened. So after that, he shared a pretty Interesting slide here. Maybe I can show that here in the stream. I think I can do that. Right. So, yeah. So, I’ll hide my face as well. Okay. sorry about that. So, he showed this slide, the lockdown, these are kind of the good that came out of the bad. I guess I could show my face because it’s really just Matt’s face. So if you could see me moving instead, not that I want to cover Matt with me, but, you still kind of see him. Great. Anyway, some of the good that came out of the bad as far as 2020 goes, the lockdown allowed for space and time to connect online and blogs. E-commerce was Patrick’s favorite mentioned here. So I’ll throw that on the screen here. E-commerce 20 billion in sales on WooCommerce. And then something I didn’t include in the note here, but it’s more than double the year before, which is absolutely crazy. So that’s a really great stat. Thanks, Patrick for highlighting that. And then Economic uncertainty. People became entrepreneurs to supplement their income. There’ve been other stats to highlight that as well, but it’s something that WordPress has been able to help with. And I thought that that was a really nice thing for Matt to highlight. Again, not just focusing on the software development here but also talking about the community and how the community has grown, either through more users, more contributors, more people coming to online events. So, and then he highlighted some WordPress sites like Tonal, to show that, “Hey, WooCommerce is a scalable e-commerce platform”, which I thought was really cool. And I think something important to talk about too, right. Because I think that WordPress and WooCommerce still kind of get the short end of the stick here, as far as, well, it’s not the performance and things like that. But, Matt highlighted some sites to show that yes, it is important. This was, I believe I didn’t start noting it until later, but I think this was the first mention of [learnwordpress.org]. The learn WordPress platform that launched this week continues to talk about how we can supplement or kind of fill the void of in-person events, make WordPress more accessible, help more people because education was kind of the third tenant of how the community has grown this year. So, WordPress and WooCommerce have allowed people to connect to scale, and scale e-commerce businesses, and learn in 2020. After that, we got a sneak peek of the site editor. So this is something that’s being worked on in core right now. Again, part of phase two is bringing the Block Editor outside of just content proposed and pages. iI the full site editor preview, we learned that the full site editor engine will store all of the changes for you so you don’t have to worry about writing any code or anything like that. It gets stored in the database for you. Theme developers, I thought it was great that they mentioned, or Matt mentioned, I, my apologies, I forget who presented this part, but they mentioned that theme developers can create templates to recreate demo content and things like that. So there’s a lot of worry over whether or not the full site editing experience will make themes, and theme developers, obsolete. But I believe there’s still a place for that. We still need theme developers as guideposts to create general designs that maybe we can build off of. Right. So I don’t think that full site editing is going to kill themes. I think it’s going to empower them to do even cooler things. And then the demo pointed out that you can make global changes from anywhere in the Block Editor to things like color, fonts, font weights, and things like that. So it was a pretty cool demo. I’ll be sure to link the State Of The Word in the description for this video. If you’re listening to this on the podcast later, it’ll be in the show notes over at [wpreview.io]. After that demo, there was a brief mention of Five For The Future. That’s people donating 5% of their time to the WordPress open source project, in some way shape, or form. But that was it. As far as I know, that’s the shortest State Of The Word at least since WordCamp US has started. Generally, the State Of The Word is around 40 minutes, 40 to 60 minutes. This one clocked in, according to my watch at 26 minutes. So it was very short. I suspect because there were like fewer applause breaks and less awkward handoffs. Right. This was a prerecorded thing. You could tell because there were certain cuts, which is good. I think that if you’re going to do something like this, it should absolutely be prerecorded. Why would you risk something like an important update like this to be subject to real-world things like noisiness outside, or internet going out, awkward handoffs doing that live. So it absolutely should have been prerecorded. I think that was very smart for Matt and the team that put this together. And then there was a lot of Q and A, so I’m not going to rehash all of the Q and A. If you go, I’ll link this in the description and in the show notes too. But if you go to my Twitter feed and follow the hashtag WPRSOTW, I did live-tweet every single question and answer, right? So one, the first question started off by asking how WordPress is integrating voice AI? I thought that was really interesting because it’s really, it hasn’t really been on any radar. But it’s something that’s growing. Matt said that he’s, it’s still at least a few years from being in core and he hasn’t thought about it. But he’s seen other people doing it. How can we get more recognition for all contributors? I think Matt floated a pretty good idea here where one form of recognition is the badge system, and an improvement could be clicking on that badge to see who else has that badge. So basically a page for each way, you can contribute to WordPress, and the contributors. I thought that was really cool. Learn WordPress was mentioned a few times. There’s been a rise in PHP jobs. How can we help employers as it relates to the Learn WordPress platform? Matt talked about. So this is interesting. Matt talks about, first organizing Learn WordPress, and getting high-quality content out there. And then next possibly self-certification or even an administered certification. When I was at the Community Summit 2015, there was a lot of discussion around this. I remember this was like my first impression of Morton. But we talked about how we can offer certification and if it would even work. And we, I, my impression coming away was we would need the WordPress foundation to be behind it for it to be credible at all. Right. I mean, we have other organizations saying that they can, WordPress certify you, but that basically just means you take their course. So I thought that this was interesting. I think that there’s probably a lot of, and Morten mentioned this on Twitter, a lot of governance that needs to happen around this. But I think that we’re talking strictly about the Learn WordPress platform here. right? This is something that would give the Learn WordPress platform a competitive edge over some other educational institutions. This episode is brought to you by Nexcess. You count on having a WordPress or WooCommerce site that’s predictably fast, secure, available, and affordable. But finding everything you need from one provider can be tough. At Nexcess, they’ve got you covered. For more than 20 years, they’ve invested time and resource into developing and integrating exclusive tools that make WordPress run better automatically. How do they do it? By including special features like no cost auto-scaling when traffic spikes, automatic plugin updates with visual comparison technology to skip updates that would break your sites, and cloud accelerator technology that makes even the most dynamic sites run faster. Add that to their automatic backups, proprietary CDN, integrated themes, security pro, and free migrations, and you won’t have to look further for the platform that does it all. They pride themselves on delivering the kind of support you need whenever you need it. Hands-on elevated 24/7, 365 service. Their support team is made up of people who have been in the trenches, and review and support thousands of stores like yours. I recently moved my WooCommerce site to their managed platform, and I have been the beneficiary of everything I just talked about earlier. From the special features to the incredible support team that helped me migrate from my old host, I couldn’t be happier being on Nexcess. They know we’re working hard to grow our businesses. And they’re our proven partner to help us get there site by site, side by side. Other platforms say it, but they do it. Their managed WordPress and managed WooCommerce are predictably awesome solutions. Because at Nexcess, better is built in. You can learn more at [wpreview.io/nexcess] That’s [wpreview.io/nexcess]. This episode in this entire series is brought to you by GoDaddy Pro. Now GoDaddy Pro has two great offerings to talk about here. They offer a robust suite of free tools to web developers and designers to help them, to help you save time managing all of your clients and sites. With GoDaddy Pro, you can easily shop for your client, monitor your client’s websites, and manage all of their WordPress websites in one place. Exclusive time-saving tools let you bulk update WordPress core plugins, and themes on multiple sites with one click. As well as automate WordPress backups, cloning, migrations, and so much more. Get real-time performance, security, and uptime monitoring across all of your client websites. Members also receive a 30% discount on new qualifying products. When you pair GoDaddy Pro with qualified WordPress and e-commerce hosting plans, the benefits are even greater by including access to all premium features at no additional cost. And now, they offer a WooCommerce hosting option too. They combined their secure hosting platform and partnered with WooCommerce. The world’s leading e-commerce platform built on WordPress to offer you GoDaddy WordPress e-commerce hosting. Included in your plan is over $1,000 worth of premium WooCommerce extensions to get your clients selling with an online store that truly reflects their unique brand. So for a limited time, they’re offering you, the listener, three months of GoDaddy WordPress e-commerce hosting for only $1. You can take advantage of that deal over at [wpreview.io/godaddy]. That’s [wpreview.io/godaddy]. Three months for $1. That is about as low risk as you could possibly get, especially for such valuable hosting. So definitely check it out. And thanks to GoDaddy Pro for their support of this podcast and the entire WordPress Year in Review project. We talked about in-person events versus virtual events and how, yes, we definitely want to see in-person events come back. But online events, virtual events are more accessible. They are more inclusive to everybody who might not be able to travel to an event. So I thought that was, you know, that question came up a lot during the State Of The Word and in the Q and A. And so there was a question about the Block Editor making them more in line with page builders. Matt mentioned that there’s a fine line that the core team is walking here, making the Block Editor as easy as possible to use as well as offering customization. And then he pointed out something that I thought was interesting. And that was that they’re doing something that’s never been done before a Wysywig editor, and he described that more. But one that is semantic and accessible with fast markup, and, I don’t think that that’s hyperbole. Right. Cause if you look at other page builders, there’s a lot of markup there that doesn’t need to be included. If you look at other websites like Squarespace and Wix, I think it’s even worse. If you look at the source code there, it looks terrible. Whereas the Block Editor, it’s doing its best to generate semantic HTML. So it’s very challenging, which means that the customizations are even more challenging. But I think as Matt pointed out where page builders are prioritizing that customization over semantics or at least over that having as let’s say spelt or as clear markup as possible, they’re prioritizing customization over that. That’s the sole reason, not the sole reason, but that’s the primary reason page builders exist. right. Is to give us more control over customization whereas the Block Editor is giving us more flexible content. But it’s prioritizing semantics, accessibility, and speed over the full customization. As we move into more full site editing, we’ll probably see that change. But, to be honest, I’ve had, you know, I mean, I have the ability to, I know CSS, I’m a web developer, I know code, I’d rather a theme just define consistently define all of the padding and margins and spacing and things like that for me. You know, CSS variables make it easier to do that, but that visual or vertical rhythm or whatever, if you’re changing every little aspect of it, if you have control to do that over every block and every piece of content, your website is going to look worse. And it might not look worse than the, “Oh my gosh. This looks like a dumpster fire geo cities website from 1998”, bad. But people are going to be reading the site going some things off about this. I’m like uncomfortable reading this. So I, you know, I think the priorities for the Block Editor are correct here. It’d be nice to have as much customization as possible, but no more, I think. There was mention of headless WordPress. And then Matt mentioned that he doesn’t like the word headless. I kind of agree. I think it’s kind of unclear. Decoupled, I think is a better term here. And then he also said he doesn’t think the decoupled is right for everything and everyone. Again, I would agree with that. I think that over the last couple of years with Gatsby and Jamstack or whatever, I don’t like barely know what Jamstack is. I think we’ve seen people decoupling and doing head lists just for the sake of it. And I don’t like doing, I mean, like on an academic level, It’s interesting. But to put in an academic hypothesis over this stuff, as this is something we should all be doing, you know, I don’t think that we should be doing that. In the actual academic realm, there’s like peer review and stuff. In web development ideas, there’s not. I was just explaining this to my wife the other day, there’s no way to verify that I’m an actual web developer. I could just say I make websites, and I make websites. And this is the same thing here. Like, oh, you can do headless with Gatsby, but like, do I need to? I think we need it. Just because we can doesn’t mean we should, right. I think we need more of just Jeff Goldblum’s character from Jurassic Park. Sorry. I’m forgetting that name. Jurassic Park fans are gonna be very mad at me. There was another question about Gutenberg and the Block Editor, as it adds more features. Do we anticipate slower page speed since? And then the answer from Riyadh, was essential since launch performance has improved the block markup must be as clean as possible. It also has semantic markup, and he mentioned a feature here that only the CSS needed for the blocks on the page are loaded now, which I think is super cool. He said he wants to see that expanded into more areas. I could not agree more. I think it’s, I’m doing this off the cuff. So my apologies if I’m messing up the technology. But either HTTP two or HTTP three, I think allows for better asynchronous, better calls. right? to the server. Multiple calls at the same time. And Amy Hall. Sorry. I’m interrupting my train of thought here. Amy Hall mentioned Dr. Ian Malcolm is Jeff Goldblum’s character. Thank you, Amy. Gosh. I was drawing a complete blank on that. So thank you for that, Amy. And thanks for joining. Anyway, so I think it’s HTTP two or HTTP three is allowing for faster and multiple requests from the browser to the server. So if we could take advantage of that technology and have kind of like we used to have, right. Smaller CSS files, that had just like certain aspects of a site that we could load and hot-swap or whatever. I think that would be really cool and help performance a lot. Another question about considering customizations to the backend. I always think about this like how can the WordPress dashboard be improved? Is it confusing? But the point was made by, I’m sorry to the person who answered this question. I did not catch your name. You know, that there are challenges that the dashboard has been unchanged for a long time. There was a UX study. Gosh, I went to an event part a few years ago, several years ago now, and, man, I really forget who did this. I’m really annoyed that I forgot who gave this talk. But they talked about how giant redesigns are actually bad for user experience because your users get used to your website being a certain way. And then you just change it on them overnight setting the learning curve or user knowledge back to zero. I think that if we are going to redesign and optimize the dashboard, the person who answered this question made a very good change. It needs to, the changes need to be iterative. Amazon is like the master of this. Amazon knows because any UX change could cost them millions of dollars. So they test and iterate, and do small changes overtime to make sure that everyone always understands how their website works to make it easier to buy things. I think we should all remember that as we go through massive redesigns, right. And make changes that are best for the user without resetting their knowledge back to zero. Wrapping up the Q and A, there was a mention of a, is there a public roadmap? What can we do? There were a lot of multi-lingual questions. So that looks like it’s on the forefront of at least the open-source projects, mind the foundation’s mind. Right? Because they selected the questions that would go into this Q and A, they were preselected. So there was a shout-out to the roadmap by Mathias. Joe Simpson Jr. asked about making a more accessible, again, that’s a nod to in-person events are great, but online events, more people can attend. There was a question about gearing content to WordCamps and WordPress events towards content creators. Josepha mentioned that’s really important. And so perhaps that will be encouraged more going into 2021. And again, more performance optimizations. It seems like the themes of the Q and A, and maybe the overall State Of The Word was a multi-lingual performance, inclusion, and openness as it relates to both the community and to virtual events. So, you know, again, if you want to read all of the questions and answers paraphrased by me, full disclosure, I was typing as fast as I could, you can see them over on the Twitter feed. And again, I thought it was interesting that the Q and A were much longer, about double the length of the actual State Of The Word. It gave more people in the community a voice. You could see it wasn’t just Matt answering questions either. He, you know, virtually passed the mic to a number of people from core contributors to the community events and Learn folks. So there were, we saw a lot more faces in this State Of The Word, not just from the Q and A, but from people actually presenting and giving answers, which I thought was really cool. One thing I think I want to make sure I find the context for this, right? Cause, again, another multi-lingual question came up and Matt pointed out that yes, he really wants that too. But they want to make sure that they get phases one and two perfect. He said if we don’t get phase one and phase two just right, phases three and four won’t matter. Again, I think that’s super important. I think that we saw the ramifications of not getting the first part of phase one. Right. It’s rolling out extremely quickly. And I think that people are still a little nervous to adopt the Block Editor. So it’s nice to see that things have slowed down a little bit and that we’re not just rushing to full site editing. And we’re not just rushing to real-time collaboration just to say that we have it. I think that we’ll see a more slower rollout of things moving forward. So, overall I enjoyed the State Of The Word. Let’s see, checking the chat. Amy mentioned that it would be great to have a content creator’s WordCamp. I agree with you, Amy. I think that I mean, Josepha has said this in her answer, she said that you can have a pretty website, but if your content is bad, I’m paraphrasing again, but if your content is bad, it doesn’t really matter. Right. And writing for the web is different from technical writing or from writing pros. And so if we can help more people in the WordPress community, more WordPress users write better, create better content for the web, then it’s going to help everybody in the WordPress community, and outside the WordPress community. I think that the Block Editor allows us. This is the whole point of the Block Editor, right? Is that we can make better, more flexible content. So if we can get the foundational stuff down at a WordCamp, I think that that’s a great idea. So, you know, Amy, let’s, I, you know what, I’m saying this live, let’s talk about what we can do for content creators in the WordPress community in 2021. I think that’s a really exciting opportunity because you’re right. As Amy just said here in the chat, they have different issues than developers and designers. So, oh, who was it? Laura asked that question, right? So we’ll get her on board and we’ll see what we can do for content creators in 2021. You’re hearing it live. I shouldn’t be saying things like this live, unless I’m really gonna like do it. So, I, you know, I guess exclusive here at first is my hopes, my yearly theme for 2021 is more opportunities. So here’s another one. Amy, I don’t want to rope you into this. You haven’t promised anything, but if you’re interested, let me know. All right. So, I’ll be on here for a few more minutes. If you want to get questions, comments, concerns in here, I’ll also look through Twitter as I was live-tweeting to see if anybody answered or asked questions, or had general thoughts? I know Morten had some thoughts on certification. I tagged him in that answer. And, you know, he had some thoughts. Amy in the chat says that she’s in. So, sweet. My first opportunity opening up for 2021 here which is exciting. I like this a lot. I’ve been really focusing on content. Yeah. In 2020, I blogged every, just about every week from when I started consciously doing it in March. I blogged. I released a YouTube video every week. I’ve released a podcast every week. And I’ve been live-streaming weekly too. So, I’m all about content. So if we can help more people create better content, I am in. That’s a mission. That’s my mission. Calypso was mentioned. Somebody asked about what technologies are you excited for in 2021? And Matt mentioned that he hopes to have more native apps. And the lessons they learned with Calypso are being used there, which is cool. Yeah. So overall I thought it was a good State Of The Word. Doug Stewart tweeted me with the API question. He said there should be an API and everything consumes it even the built-in front ends. That is the appropriate way to use, I believe that’s an, he believes too, and he’s a lot smarter than me. That’s the appropriate way to use an API, right? You have an API and your products also consume that API. And PR was doing this I think in 2012. They built their own content management system with an API. And then everything consumed that aid from their apps, their website, their, you know, real-time alerts and things like that. So, I think it’s NPR. I think it was Jen Simmons, or Erika Hall who talked about this. I’m digging like eight years back at this point. So forgive me if I’ve mentioned the wrong person. But I think that’s absolutely correct as well. So, all in all, it was a great State Of The Word. I thought it was pretty tight. There were a lot of good questions from a lot of good people. And then I got to do this analysis and podcast. I’m undecided as to whether or not I’m just going to release this raw audio for the podcast, or if I’m going to edit it to remove live stream-specific mentions. If you’re listening to the podcast, you’ll know, I decided. But to everybody who tuned in to this live stream or is watching on the replay later, leave a comment with your question and I’ll dive in and answer it. But, thanks to everybody who live-tweeted the State Of The Word with me. Thanks to everybody who joined in on this live stream with me. And until next time, get out there and build something.

Other Episodes

Episode 25

September 30, 2021 00:19:44
Episode Cover

Cutthroat software development in an open source world

It's been 10 years since WooCommerce was forked from JigoShop and turned into the giant of the ecommerce space that is it today. And while it was maybe a little cutthroat, the problem doesn't necessary lie with the fork. It lies with the way you position your product, and your business. Plus, thoughts on all the aquisitions from last week!  Show Notes Acquisitions are at an all time high LearnDash Joins the Liquid Web Family of Brands Awesome Motive has acquired our WordPress products and services WP Landing Kit Is Joining the Themeisle Family of Products! Celebrating 10 years of WooCommerce WooCommerce Marks 10 Year Anniversary of Forking Jigoshop 2021 Holiday Ecommerce Summit WordCamp US 2021 Safari Extensions for iOS and iPadOS 15: A Roundup of Our Favorites ‎Amplosion: Redirect AMP Links ...

Listen

Episode 45

April 14, 2022 00:22:13
Episode Cover

Must-Use WordPress Tools for Freelancers (Part 1)

Niching down doesn’t just need to be about the customers you serve. It can also be about the tools you use. Deeply understanding the tools you use allows you to work more quickly and efficiently because there’s not a constant learning curve. Putting together the perfect WordPress toolkit is important for any freelancer. In Part 1 of this series, we'll cover my must-have tools.  Brought to you by GoDaddy Pro. Get all of the show notes, and a written to be read article over at https://wpreview.io/45 ...

Listen

Episode 19

July 15, 2021 00:40:42
Episode Cover

Is Good Hosting Worth It? Is College? Plus an Interview with WordFest Organizers

A couple of big news items this week, neither of which have to do with acquisitions (mostly). Plus, I respond to a WP Tavern article about college degrees, and get to chat with Dan Maby and Hauwa Abashiya of WordFest! (more…) ...

Listen